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Firework Photos

Discussion in 'Photography' started by PaulaK, Feb 9, 2011.

  1. PaulaK

    PaulaK Moderator

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    How do people get such clear photos of fireworks with the trails really sharp? They almost look like they've been drawn. Mine are always just blurs with smoke patterns. :hehe:
     
  2. Kate

    Kate New Member

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    Mine are blurred too, i used to have a camera with a sports setting on so if i took a photo of something moving it didnt blur. My "new" camera doesnt have that on so they dont come out so good.
     
  3. SportsMickey

    SportsMickey A walking SportsCenter

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    What kind of camera are you using? Are you using a tripod? Are you using a remote release?
     
  4. PaulaK

    PaulaK Moderator

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    Canon 500D (T1i in USA I think). Yes and yes. :hehe: Most of mine are taken from across the lake rather than close up.
     
  5. MKJo

    MKJo Moderator

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    Some of mine came out ok, apart from the smoke. Googled for ages to try find out how to remove smoke, but didn't find anything that worked completely :shrug:
     
  6. ThinkTink

    ThinkTink Moderator

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    Long exposure time is key too:

    1093948855_eV3Dr-M.jpg

    Paula this is from the desert party we went to. I used my tripod and trigger release. ISO is set at 100 f-stop at f9.

    As for smoke, there is no way to remove it sort of using the clone stamp and picking up black from somewhere else in the picture. Sometimes if you up your contrast setting when you're editing some of it will 'go away'. As you can see in my picture though, I have smoke - nothing I could do about it.
     
  7. SportsMickey

    SportsMickey A walking SportsCenter

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    I go to bulb and have similar settings to TT
     
  8. ThinkTink

    ThinkTink Moderator

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    Bulb is under your Manual Settings - on a Canon, for those of you trying to find it. :thumbs:
     
  9. SportsMickey

    SportsMickey A walking SportsCenter

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    Oops, would have been helpful to include that right? Yes, what TT said
     
  10. Slipstream

    Slipstream New Member

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    A much higher f stop than you would think - fireworks make their own light and it's got a hugh UV content which the chip sees better than you - tripod, remote shutter and multiple shots if you can just open and wait to see what you get - the multiple exposures will bring out the background - without the ground detail fireworks just look random - you need trees, buildings or water to give it context - the smoke is just luck - a slightly windy night helps with the wind at your back.
    Video is pretty unsucessful - I've done shows the BBC and Sky filmed - blagged a tape or dashed home to catch it on the news and it never looks as good live as still photography makes it.

    Colin - Midnight Storm Fireworks
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2011
  11. wdwfigment

    wdwfigment New Member

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    My settings usually look like this:
    1.8 ND filter
    f/7.1-9
    8-250 seconds

    tripod, obviously
    remote shutter release
    bulb mode

    Hope that helps.
     
  12. MKJo

    MKJo Moderator

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    Is an ND filter the key to getting that final shot with multiple bursts that would otherwise turn out too bright/all white?
     
  13. Slipstream

    Slipstream New Member

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    Neutral Density Filter reduces the light by six f-stops.
    The use of an ND filter allows the photographer to utilize a larger aperture that is at or below the diffraction limit, which varies depending on the size of the sensory medium (film or digital) and for many cameras, is between f/8 and f/11, with smaller sensory medium sizes needing larger sized apertures, and larger ones able to use smaller apertures.
    Instead of reducing the aperture to limit light, the photographer can add a ND filter to limit light, and can then set the shutter speed according to the particular motion desired (blur of water movement, for example) and the aperture set as needed (small aperture for maximum sharpness or large aperture for narrow depth of field (subject in focus and background out of focus). Using a digital camera, the photographer can see the image right away, and can choose the best ND filter to use for the scene being captured by first knowing the best aperture to use for maximum sharpness desired. The shutter speed would be selected by finding the desired blur from subject movement. The camera would be set up for these in manual mode, and then the overall exposure then adjusted darker by adjusting either aperture or shutter speed, noting the number of stops needed to bring the exposure to that which is desired. That offset would then be the amount of stop needed in the ND filter to use for that scene.
    Examples of this use include:
    • Blurring water motion (e.g. waterfalls, rivers, oceans).
    • Reducing depth of field in very bright light (i.e. daylight).
    • When using a flash on a camera with a focal-plane shutter, exposure time is limited to the maximum speed -often 1/250th of a second, at best- at which the entire film or sensor is exposed to light at one instant. Without an ND filter this can result in the need to use f8 or higher.
    • Using a wider aperture to stay below the diffraction limit.
    • Reduce the visibility of moving objects
    • Add motion blur to subjects
     
  14. Coo1eo

    Coo1eo New Member

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    Location:
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    Canon 40D
    Focal Length = 28
    ISO = 400
    5 s @ f/16
    No ND Filter & No Flash

    [​IMG]

    Coo1eo
    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2012
  15. PaulaK

    PaulaK Moderator

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  16. Tishypops

    Tishypops New Member

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    I would love to take a class on photography, I have always wanted to know how to do it properly...I dont know what most of the settings on my camera are for :blush:
     
  17. Coo1eo

    Coo1eo New Member

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    PaulaK, try it now see if this works for you.


    Coo1eo
    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
     
  18. Coo1eo

    Coo1eo New Member

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    The salesman that sold me my Canon 40D said it best. "You will need to put in about 400 hours of shooting just to become comfortable with your camera".


    Coo1eo
    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
     
  19. PaulaK

    PaulaK Moderator

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    Wow! Fabulous! :fworks:
     
  20. mcduck

    mcduck Member

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    Taken with my Motorola Xoom
     

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